Invited Speakers

This page refers to the 2015 edition. Please use the menu to access most recent content.

 

Rebecca Barthelemie

Rebecca Barthelemie

Title: Wakes from scanning lidar measurements OR An overview of the PEIWEE experiment 2015


Rebecca J Barthelmie is a Croll Fellow and Professor in the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Cornell University. Her research encompasses many aspects of wind energy but focuses on resources and wind turbine wakes with an emphasis on large wind farms. She is author of more than 110 journal papers, 11 book chapters and 400 conference papers and reports. She is co-chief editor of the journal Wind Energy, and on the science and technical committees of many wind energy conferences. At Risø National Laboratory from 1993-2006 she worked on more than 10 offshore wind farms in Europe in various roles including resource measurement, modeling and consultancy. She led several large international projects including ‘Efficient Development of Offshore Wind Farms’ and was the leader of the ‘Flow’ workpackage in the large international project ‘UPwind’ funded by the European Commission. In 2009 she received the annual scientific award from the European Wind Energy Academy for ‘her extraordinary efforts and achievements in the field of wind energy research’. She is currently the lead on a number of research projects funded by the Department of Energy and National Science Foundation in the USA focused on wind turbines wakes and resource characterization in large wind farms on- and offshore.
Peter Clive

Peter Clive

Title: Application of scanning LiDAR in wind energy research


Peter has been associated with the wind power industry since taking his PhD in physics in 2002. He has had a central role in the development of the Galion Lidar, the 2nd generation wind Lidar system. This system enables wind fields to be surveyed with previously unobtainable detail and precision, revealing flow characteristics and structures that have a significant impact on the productivity and longevity of wind power assets. Peter also pioneered the introduction of response deficit analysis into wind turbine performance assessment, allowing the expertise and experience of wind analysts to be leveraged in the most focused and cost effective manner. His interests also include innovative resource assessment techniques that extract all the available information from the long and short term datasets from target and reference sites, minimizing project uncertainty and boosting project value. Peter has published widely on the subject of Lidar and has addressed many conferences around the world.
Douglas Cairns

Douglas Cairns

Title: Effects of Defects on Wind Turbine Blade Reliability


Doug Cairns is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering of the Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Department at MSU. Prior to coming to MSU, he was Manager of Composites Technology at Hercules Materials Company (Now Hexcel) where he conducted research on composite materials applied to primary structure. He has a B.S. and M.S. from the University of Wyoming, and a Ph.D. in Aeronautics and Astronautics the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a Member of ASME (Composite Materials Subcommittee), AIAA (past Materials Technical Committee Chairman). He is Chairman of the Mechanical Engineering Graduate Studies Committee. His current professional interests include the understanding of advanced materials as applied to primary structure and understanding the materials, manufacturing, and structural performance link for new engineering systems. Dr. Cairns has funding from the Office of Naval Research, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory – Wind Technology Center, and the U.S. Air Force. Prof. Cairns is the Chief Engineer for Radius Engineering in Salt Lake City, Utah and consults for several industrial and private sector partners.
Horia Hangan

Horia Hangan

Title: New multi-scale physical simulations for Wind Energy in the WindEEE Dome


DDr. Horia Hangan is a Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental at Western University and the Director of the Wind Engineering, Energy and Environment (WindEEE) Research Institute (www.windeee.ca).
He received his Diplomat Engineering Degree in Aeronautics from the Polytechnic University of Bucharest, Romania in 1985, continued his graduate studies at Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland in 1991-1992 and obtained his Ph.D. in Wind Engineering at the University of Western Ontario, Canada in 1996. After postdoctoral studies at Universite de Poitiers in France he rejoined Western in 1997 as a faculty member with Western Engineering. He was an Assistant Professor between 1997 and 2002, a tenured Associate Professor between 2002 and 2009 and has been promoted to Full Professor in 2009.
In 2009, Professor Hangan received a 30 million dollar grant by the federal (Canada Foundation for Innovation) and provincial (Ontario Research Fund) funding agencies to design and built the WindEEE Dome. WindEEE is a world novel facility meant to reproduce and study the impact of three-dimensional and time dependent wind systems on the man-made and natural habitat.
Professor Hangan’s research is in the simulation and impact of high intensity winds (downbursts and tornados), wind energy (wakes, sitting in complex terrain, wind turbine blade aerodynamics) and wind environmental impacts (urban wind environment, atmospheric pollution-dispersion, wind-driven rain and snow). He authored 2 book chapters and more than 200 journal and conference publications, acts as reviewer and is part of the Editorial Board of several international journals such as Journal of Fluid Mechanics, AIAA Journal, Journal of Fluids and Structures, ASME Journal of Fluids Engineering, ASME Journal of Solar (and Wind) Energy, Journal of Wind Engineering and Industrial Aerodynamics. He is member of several professional organizations such as the Board of Directors of the Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering (CSME), Task Committee Leader of the ASCE on Non-synoptic winds, the Technical Committee of the National Institute Standards and Technology (NIST). He is presently on the Western University Research Board.
Michael Harris

Michael Harris

Title: Lidar in the wind industry: from the lunatic fringe to mainstream acceptance


Michael Harris has played a pioneering role in the development of lidar for the wind industry. He received a Class 1 degree in Physics from Oxford University in 1980; following his PhD in Atomic Physics from the University of Newcastle, he worked at the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA), Boulder, Colorado, and at the University of Essex. He joined DRA (now QinetiQ) Malvern in 1993, and became a Fellow of the Institute of Physics in 2001. He has contributed to the invention and design of a variety of lidar systems including the ZephIR laser anemometer. Until 2008 he was Technical/Team Leader for Remote Sensing at QinetiQ Malvern, and is currently Chief Scientist at Zephir Lidar, where he continues to develop and promote laser anemometry for use in the wind energy industry.
David Hickey

David Hickey

Title: Business Perspective and Useable Innovation


Based in Oakville, Ontario, David Hickey is the Vice President of Wind Power and Renewables Division for Siemens Canada Limited and is responsible for all strategy, sales, supply chain, project management and operations of the Division throughout Canada. David has broad experience in leadership roles across the Wind Power and Fossil Power Generation portfolios with an emphasis in Project Management in Canada, the United States, and Scotland. Before joining Siemens in 2001, David was a Project Manager/Quantity Surveyor for various Property/Residential Developers in Scotland. David holds a Bachelor’s degree in Quantity Surveying from Glasgow Caledonian University in Scotland.
David Maniaci

David Maniaci

Title: Wake Validation Experiment Planning for the SWiFT Facility


David Maniaci is the Rotor Blade and Wind Plant Aerodynamics Lead in the Wind Energy Technologies Department at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. His current research includes the verification and validation of models that capture wind turbine wake dynamics, studying the effects of leading-edge erosion and soiling on airfoil and rotor performance, and the functional scaling and design of rotor blades. He received a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering from the Pennsylvania State University, where he was an instructor of aircraft design for several years and performed research in applied aerodynamics, wind tunnel testing, and wind turbine aerodynamics.
Jakob Mann

Jakob Mann

Title: Experimental investigations of flow over terrain for wind energy


Jakob Mann got his Master degree in Astrophysics in 1990 from Aarhus University, Denmark and his PhD in 1994 about micrometeorology from Aalborg University, Denmark, for work done at Risø National Laboratory on various aspects of atmospheric turbulence. Jakob is now Professor of Wind Energy and Atmospheric Turbulence at the Technical University of Denmark where he also works with Doppler lasers. He is currently president for the European Academy of Wind Energy providing high quality conferences on wind energy and PhD seminars for all wind energy students in Europe. As a part that work Jakob is heading an effort to launch a new open-access journal called Wind Energy Science. Starting 2015, Jakob heads the New European Wind Atlas project with the goal of providing experimentally validated models and data for wind turbine site assessment all over Europe.
Torben Mikkelsen

Torben Mikkelsen

Title: 3D Wind Field Measurements obtained with DTU Wind Energy’s Space and Time Synchronized WindScanners


Professor Torben Mikkelsen from DTU Wind Energy Denmark engages with wind remote sensing measurement systems for wind energy research, in particular atmospheric boundary-layer wind and turbulence research. Torben Mikkelsen is engaged with research and technological developments in the Test and Measurement Section in the Wind Energy Department at the Technical University of Denmark, DTU. As daily leader of the WindScanner Research and Innovation team he is engaged with the development of remote sensing-based research infrastructure experimental research facility called WindScanner, cf. www.windscanner.dk and www.WindScanner.eu. He is also engaged with scientific instrument development, in particular with the development of innovation products such as the wind lidar based WindScanners for turbine inflow (SpinnerLidar) and other exiting remote sensing devices, including also small “Lidic telescopes” for wind tunnel reference measurement and wind industry applications. Professor Mikkelsen received his PhD from the Technical University of Denmark in 1983, followed by a Postdoc position as Associate research professor at the Naval Postgraduate School, 1985-1986 in Monterey, Ca USA, Departments of Meteorology and Physics. He became full professor at DTU in 2011. His scientific background is plasma physics, atmospheric sciences, atmospheric dispersion and atmospheric boundary-layer wind and turbulence.
Jonathan Naughton

Jonathan Naughton

Title:


Jonathan W. Naughton has been a faculty member in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Wyoming since 1997 and is currently a Professor and Director of the Wind Energy Research Center. Dr. Naughton obtained his B.S. from Cornell University and his Ph.D. from the Pennsylvania State University in the area of compressible fluid dynamics. Prior to joining the UW faculty, Dr. Naughton worked at NASA-Ames Research Center for four years. During the 2004-2005 academic year, Dr. Naughton was a visiting faculty at Chalmers Technical University in Gothenberg, Sweden where he worked with the turbulence research laboratory. Dr. Naughton’s current research includes the development of skin-friction measurement techniques and turbulent flow measurement, modeling and control with applications to jet flows, wake flows, base drag reduction, unsteady blade aerodynamics, and atmospheric boundary layer modeling. As the Wind Energy Research Center has grown, Dr. Naughton spends an increasing amount of time interacting with industry, government labs, state organizations, and academic institutions involved in developing the understanding and technology necessary for expanding the penetration of wind energy into the electricity market with a particular focus on the development of Wyoming wind resources. Faculty from the center were recently awarded a 4.25 million dollar grant considering the interaction between wind farm efficiency, transmission stability, and economics of transmission. Dr. Naughton is an active member of the American Physical Society, the American Helicopter Society, and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. In the latter society, Dr. Naughton is an Associate Fellow and served as the Chair of the Aerodynamic Measurement Technology Technical Committee from 2008-2010. He is married to Leann and has two sons, Kian and Evan. Dr. Naughton is also an Alpine Trainer with the Professional Ski Instructors of America – Rocky Mountain Division.
Hassan Peerhossaini

Hassan Peerhossaini

Title: Laminar mixing for energy efficiency: theory and experiment


Dr. Hassan Peerhossaini is Distinguished Professor of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer at the University of Paris (France) where he directs the Paris Interdisciplinary Energy Research Institute (PIERI). His research focuses on the physics of turbulence in reactive flows, hydrodynamic stability and transition to turbulence, active fluid dynamics, convective heat transfer, heat transfer and process intensification, energy efficiency, bio-resourced energy, and in particular on chaotic advection and its technological applications. His research interests lie also in interdisciplinary approach to energy systems and its social and economic impacts. He is the author of more than 450 publications including refereed archival papers, full length proceeding papers and technical reports. He received the ASME 2013 Lewis F. Moody award for his work on mixing. H. Peerhossaini has been associate editor of the ASME Journal of Fluids Engineering (2007-2013) and is currently associate editor of the Journal of Applied Fluid Mechanics.
Dr. Peerhossaini is a member of the French “Haut Comité de Mécanique”, scientific delegate of the French “Haut Conseil d’Evaluation de Recherche et Enseignement Supérieur”, Director of the “Energy of Tomorrow” program of Sorbonne Paris Cité, and member of several national and international scientific committees. He has been Deputy Director of the interdisciplinary energy program of CNRS. hassan.peerhossaini@univ-paris-diderot.fr
Marianne Rodgers

Marianne Rodgers

Title: Research Activities on an Operating Wind Farm


Dr. Marianne Rodgers has been the Scientific Director at the Wind Energy Institute of Canada (WEICan) in North Cape, PEI since March, 2014. Prior to joining WEICan, Marianne researched many types of alternative energies, including fuel cells, batteries, and photovoltaics, at the Florida Solar Energy Center in Cocoa, Florida. Marianne holds a B.Sc. in chemistry from St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, NS and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, BC. Marianne’s research in alternative energy has resulted in more than 40 publications and more than 40 invited and conference presentations.
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Scott Schreck

Title: Controlled Inflow Experiments for A2e Wake Modeling and Validation


Scott Schreck joined NREL’s National Wind Technology Center in 1998, and since then has served in diverse roles within the center, ranging from basic and applied research to utility scale technology development. At present, he leads various large-scale experimental efforts, supported by both DOE and industry partners, which are aimed at understanding the fluid mechanics of the wind turbine, wind plant, and atmosphere, as the determinants of energy production and machine structural loads.
Early in his career at NREL, Scott’s responsibilities included planning and analyses of experiments in the NASA Ames 80’ x 120’ wind tunnel, as well as establishment of International Energy Agency Annex 20, a multinational consortium of turbine aerodynamics researchers from Asia, Europe, and North America for developing and validating turbine aerodynamics models. Subsequently, Scott managed the Low Wind Speed Technologies program, DOE’s $40M multiyear effort for utility scale wind energy technology development. This effort consisted of a portfolio of industry-NREL subcontracts for developing wind turbine prototypes and components, and for conceptualizing long range technologies.
Before coming to NREL, Scott was an Air Force officer and led a variety of defense science and engineering programs. These included the USAF Seiler Research Laboratory/Air Force Academy unsteady aerodynamics research program, a joint effort aimed at aircraft maneuverability enhancement. His final assignment was with the Air Force Office of Scientific Research where he managed the Computational Mathematics Program, a multidisciplinary program that supported university, industry, and Air Force laboratory computational research efforts in fluid dynamics, combustion, structures, materials, nanotechnology, multidisciplinary design optimization, and parallelization.
William Shaw

William Shaw

Title: Wind Plant of the Future: DOE’s A2e Initiative


Dr. Shaw is a Staff Scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In a career spanning three decades he has specialized in turbulence and structure of the atmospheric boundary layer, including air-sea interaction and boundary layers in complex terrain. In the last decade, he has focused on boundary layer processes affecting wind energy. He has published nearly 50 articles in peer-reviewed journals. His recent work has included a one-year assignment in 2010–11 at DOE headquarters providing technical and programmatic support to DOE’s Wind and Water Power Program. He currently serves on the Executive Management Committee of DOE’s Atmosphere to Electrons (A2e) Initiative as the laboratory lead for the atmospheric sciences component of that program across the DOE national laboratories.
Alberto Zasso

Alberto Zasso

Title: Scale Model Technology for Wind Energy: Numerical vs Experimental Validation in Wind Tunnel


Alberto Zasso having received a PhD in Mechanical Engineering in 1989, is now Full Professor in Applied Mechanics at Politecnico di Milano, chairing the courses of Applied Mechanics, Mechanical Vibrations (BSc Mech. Eng.), Dynamics of Mechanical Systems, being Lecturer on Wind Engineering (Building Aerodynamics, Structures Aeroelasticity) (MSc Mech. Eng.), responsible for the course “Atmospheric Boundary Layer, fundamental physics and modelling” (PhD Mech. POLIMI). His research is in the field of Structures Dynamics due to Wind Interaction applied to long-span bridges and high rise buildings, bluff body aerodynamics and vortex shedding induced vibrations. The key research became recently wind energy and CFD with focus on aerodynamic boundary layer numerical modelling and wind tunnel scale model validation of CFD wind interaction numerical modelling. He made experience on wind tunnel testing of horizontal axis (scaled models) and vertical axis (full scale prototypes) wind turbines, as well as implementation on HPC of CFD LES modelling of horizontal axis wind turbines. The scientific activity resulted in more than 100 publications at National and International level. He has been responsible for the design and realization of the Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel at Campus Bovisa, being at present the Director of the facility. Member of TPWind the European Wind Energy Technology Platform and POLIMI Representative at EERA JP Wind Energy, he participated to relevant international projects: member of the Panel of Specialists for the P.M.C. of Stretto di Messina Suspension Bridge, member of the design team of the BB3 Third Bosphorous Bridge for aerodynamics, leader of the POLIMI team awarded by PRACE-INCOME4WINDFARMS-Innovative HPC Computational Methods for Wind Farms, partner of the EU project LIFES50+ on offshore floating wind turbines.
Tanay Sidki Uyar

Tanay Sidki Uyar

Title: Transition to Ecological and Democratic Societies using 100 % Renewable Energy Community Power


Dr. Uyar has been a Professor of Renewable Energy at Marmara University since 2001, where he heads the Faculty of Engineering. He also serves as President of Eurosolar Turkey and Conference Chair of IRENEC 2013. From 1994-2001, he was an Assistant Professor at Kocaeli University on the Faculty of Technical Education at the Department of Electrical Education. Previous professional experience includes being a Senior Research Scientist during TUBITAK, Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey, Marmara, serving as a member of the Energy Systems Research Department at the Scientific and Industrial Research Institute, and holding the position of Director of the Chamber of Electrical Engineers Istanbul Branch from 1976-1978. He completed his formal education in Istanbul, Turkey, receiving his BSc and MSc (the latter in Nuclear Engineering) from Boğaziçi University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering. He received his PhD from Yıldız Technical University, Mechanical Engineering Department. Dr. Uyar also serves as Vice President of the World Wind Energy Association, Board Member of the International Solar Energy Society, Board member of the World Bioenergy Association, and Member of the World Council for Renewable Energy.

This page refers to the 2015 edition. Please use the menu to access most recent content.